Rise of the junk food generation as burnt out Brits struggle to cope with stress

BAC LogoResearch for Acupuncture Awareness Week shows stressed Brits need to get to the point.

A new study out today reveals Edinburgh stress levels are on the increase and we are risking our health by turning to sugary food, takeaways and alcohol to help cope with modern life. The study by the British Acupuncture Council to mark ‘Acupuncture Awareness Week’ (2nd-8th March 2015) shows that over half of Edinburgh respondents are more stressed now than ten years ago but are turning to junk food and booze in a bid to make themselves feel better.

The study of 5,000 adults found that a third of us admit to comfort eating when stressed, 1 in 5 confess to drinking alcohol and as a result a quarter admit they put on weight. More

BAC LogoResearch for Acupuncture Awareness Week shows stressed Brits need to get to the point.

A new study out today reveals Edinburgh stress levels are on the increase and we are risking our health by turning to sugary food, takeaways and alcohol to help cope with modern life. The study by the British Acupuncture Council to mark ‘Acupuncture Awareness Week’ (2nd-8th March 2015) shows that over half of Edinburgh respondents are more stressed now than ten years ago but are turning to junk food and booze in a bid to make themselves feel better.

The study of 5,000 adults found that a third of us admit to comfort eating when stressed, 1 in 5 confess to drinking alcohol and as a result a quarter admit they put on weight. More than 60% do not sleep well. More than 40% admit to having depression as a result of stress.

Despite 70% of the our city’s respondents saying they are aware prolonged periods of stress can have a long term impact on their health, almost half of people admit they just put up with it and two thirds say stress is unavoidable in their life. A lack of time (33%) wanting to have it all (17%) and difficulty switching off from work (24%) were cited as the top reasons for the rise of burnt out Edinburgh residents.

Charmaine Shepherd, a qualified member of the British Acupuncture Council comments:

“Stress can make it difficult to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Reaching for your favourite foods or treating yourself to that bottle of wine after a hectic day may make you feel better in the short term but it won’t tackle the root cause of the problem. Traditional acupuncture is an effective, evidence-based therapy that can be a positive step for anyone wanting to get their stress levels back under control.”

With 2.3 million acupuncture treatments carried out each year, traditional acupuncture is one of the most popular complementary therapies practised in the UK today. Based on ancient principles which go back nearly two thousand years, traditional acupuncture involves placing extremely fine, sterile needles painlessly at specific points on the body to trigger a healing response and restoring balance.

Despite acupuncture’s widely recognised health benefits, many of us are missing the point when it comes to this ancient Chinese medicine. Statistics show that only 6% of Edinburgh residents have tried acupuncture to cope with stress and 74% say they didn’t know the therapy can help to release endorphins, the body’s feel-good hormones.

Charmaine Shepherd continues:

“Although the research shows 1 in 10 of us think stress isn’t serious enough to seek help, it’s common to feel exhausted, overwhelmed and even depressed so finding support is vital. A course of traditional acupuncture helps to target the root cause of the problem as treatment is unique for each individual. Typically the cause could be a deficiency in the body exacerbated by overwork, working long hours, burning the candle at both ends or a lack of proper rest and nourishing food. Together with a specific treatment plan which addresses diet, exercise and lifestyle, many of my patients find traditional acupuncture to be a wonderfully relaxing experience. When looking for a practitioner, make sure you find a qualified acupuncturist registered with the British Acupuncture Council to ensure a high standard of care and safety.”

Edinburgh based Centre for Holistic Health holds a low-cost community clinic every Thursday morning making acupuncture more accessible to the public.

To find out more about traditional acupuncture visit www.introducingacupuncture.co.uk.

To find a fully qualified traditional acupuncturist in your area contact the British Acupuncture Council, on 020 8735 0400 or visit www.acupuncture.org.uk

-Ends-

Notes to editors:

5,000 UK adults were questioned by One Poll, December 2014

About the Centre for Holistic Health

The Centre for Holistic Health, in York Place offers a wide range of holistic, alternative and complementary medicine including: acupuncture, biofeedback, osteopathy, bodywork, reflexology, homeopathy, herbal medicine, nutritional therapy and massage. Our therapists have a special interest in working with emotional concerns, mental health, stress menopause, fertility, pregnancy, babies, pain and fatigue. The edge we have over every other holistic or alternative medicine centres in Edinburgh is our patient-centred holistic approach.

Low-Cost  Acupuncture for the Community

On a budget but need acupuncture treatment? Restricted by time to get acupuncture treatment? The acupuncture Community Clinic may be for you! We run most Thursday mornings between 08:30 and 12 at the Centre for Holistic Health, 5A York Place.  www.centre4holistichealth.co.uk

Tel 0131 556 8440 Email  info@centre4holistichealth.co.uk

The CC has for over seven years been available to many who would usually have no access to this alternative therapy. The no-frills treatment means that more patients can be seen at one time, reducing the cost considerably. We believe that health care should be more accessible to all that need it regardless of their financial situation. We will try to accommodate as many patients as we can.

Our community clinic sessions cost £15 whereas private acupuncture sessions in Edinburgh range between £35 and £60 per session. Tel 0131 556 8440 to make an appointment.

About Charmaine Shepherd B.Sc. Biomed., N.dip. Ac, MBAcC

As a therapist I am dedicated to helping individuals take control of their own health as I firmly believe in supporting the body’s natural ability to heal through the use of natural remedies, nutrition and lifestyle. I like to have a sensitive and holistic approach to healthcare as it is essential that you feel in control of your treatment.

I originally obtained my degree in biomedical sciences 17 years ago and worked for several years in biomedical research before deciding to move into complementary medicine. I went on to study acupuncture for 3 years in Asia. I qualified as an acupuncturist in 2005 and became a member of the British Acupuncture Council (BAcC). Please note that all members of the BAcC are bound by strict codes of Practice and Ethics.

I have had extensive training in Singapore, China, Thailand, Switzerland and the UK, which introduced me to wide range of interesting people & cultures, and have had more than 15 years experience in health-care.

During my time in Asia, I built expertise in treating a wide variety of complex conditions. I also spent time gaining clinical experience at the Shanghai Research Institute of Acupuncture in China, in the Urology and Neurology departments.

About the British Acupuncture Council

The British Acupuncture Council (BAcC) is the UK’s largest governing body of traditional acupuncture with over 3,000 members – each of whom is an accredited practitioner providing the highest standard of professional care to patients.

BAcC members practise a traditional, holistic style of acupuncture diagnosis and treatment based on a system developed and refined over 2,000 years. This style of acupuncture differs from that used by medical practitioners such as physiotherapists where the technique of ‘dry needling’ is adopted. Although both practises use needles, dry needling aims for ‘trigger points’ whereas traditional acupuncture is based on the meridian system. Medical acupuncturists usually have fewer training hours in the technique of acupuncture and use it as part of their practice alongside conventional treatments.

To achieve BAcC membership practitioners must first undertake extensive training in acupuncture (minimum three years full-time at BSc or BA degree level) which includes physiology, anatomy and other biomedical sciences appropriate to the practice of acupuncture and their expert practice skills are maintained by following a mandatory individual programme of continuing professional development (CPD). BAcC membership is also a mark of assurance of high standards in professionalism, training and safety.

The British Acupuncture Council is also accredited by the Professional Standards Authority under its Accredited Voluntary Registers (AVR) scheme. Being accredited under the AVR scheme offers enhanced protection to anyone looking for an acupuncturist – people now have the option of seeking practitioners on a register that has been vetted and approved. 

The edge we have over every other holistic or alternative medicine centre in Edinburgh is our patient-centred holistic approach. Our therapists do not merely ‘rent rooms’ we work together to treat the whole person using what ever therapies are needed. Therapies include: acupuncture, biofeedback, osteopathy, bodywork, reflexology, homeopathy, massage and nutritional support. Available at our Centre located at 5a York Place, Edinburgh.

Ihre Meinung ist wichtig!

Persönliche Angaben freiwillig! Ihre E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht.